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Robin Jung has extensive experience in automotive products liability defense, breach of warranty defense, financial services litigation, and general business litigation. Mr. Jung previously practiced insurance coverage defense (property and commercial liability) and has represented clients in state, federal and appellate courts. Mr. Jung has represented corporate manufacturers of automobiles, pharmaceuticals, industrial machinery, and consumer hand tools, as well as major banks and mortgage servicers. He was also recently seconded as in-house litigation counsel for a multi-national automobile manufacturer, where he managed products liability litigation for the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico as well as regulatory compliance with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

On April 30, 2021, SAE International updated its “Taxonomy and Definitions for Terms Related to Driving Automation Systems for On-Road Motor Vehicles,” labeled SAE J3016_202104. This updated version cancels and supersedes the June 2018 version, labeled SAE J3016_201806. Its basic framework remains intact with six levels of driving automation, ranging from no driving automation (Level 0) to full driving automation (Level 5).

Continue Reading SAE Updates J3016 Standard for Automated Driving Systems With More Clarity and New Terms and Definitions

As first reported by Reuters on April 22, Sens. Gary Peters (D-Mich.) and John Thune (R-S.D.) had recently released drafts of an amendment that would allow the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to exempt 15,000 self-driving vehicles per manufacturer from safety standards that were written for human drivers. Within three years, that figure would rise to 80,000, and after four years, manufacturers could ask NHTSA to increase exemptions beyond 80,000 vehicles. At this time, NHTSA only allows exemptions of up to 2,500 vehicles per manufacturer.

In a statement, Sen. Peters said the amendment would “ensure that the innovation and testing around autonomous vehicles can continue happening safely under the watchful eye of the Department of Transportation.” The Senators had planned to attach the amendment to “The AI Scholarship-for-Service Act,” a bill providing $100 billion for science and technology research and development with the aim of maintaining U.S. competitiveness with China.
Continue Reading Proposed Amendment to Advance Self-Driving Cars is Postponed Amidst Rising Safety Concerns