Photo of Laura C. Baucus

Laura Baucus is a results-oriented litigator and business attorney with experience delivering consistent results to clients in the automotive, aerospace, manufacturing and financial services industries. Ms. Baucus has worked both as outside counsel and as seconded in-house counsel. She is the Director of Dykema’s 140+ attorney Automotive Industry Group, the immediate past Leader of the firm’s Financial Services Litigation Practice, a Leader in Dykema’s COVID-19 Task-Force, the originator of the firm’s Supply Chain Group, the Manager of a firm OEM client-service team, and the immediate past Manager of the firm’s largest Michigan office.

Ms. Baucus regularly counsels clients on force majeure and related contract performance options. Her litigation practice focuses on procurement and supply chain, recalls, warranty and cost recovery, contract termination, tooling recovery, Uniform Commercial Code issues, and financial services.  Her contract practice includes negotiating and drafting supply contracts and other commercial agreements for automotive and other manufacturing companies, including terms and conditions. Ms. Baucus also manages national portfolios of lawsuits for some of the nation’s largest residential mortgage servicers.

Insurance Claims, Force Majeure Notices and Protecting Other Legal Rights In The Wake Of Global Supply Chain Disruption Caused By COVID-19

Dykema is closely monitoring the potential threat of legal fallouts in the wake of supply chain disruption caused by the novel Coronavirus (also known as COVID-19). In the last month, companies reliant on the global supply chain have been faced with part shortages and overall supply chain disruption. Production facility shutdowns as well as halted transportation, primarily in China, are the main causes of these issues. As the virus spreads, it is expected that facilities and transportation in other countries will be impacted as they seek to contain the virus.

Practically speaking, your company should mitigate business risks caused by current and anticipated supply chain disruption, including: 1) obtaining up-to-date production information on all players in your global supply chain, both upstream and downstream; and 2) making arrangements to secure alternative parts and materials to ensure continuity of supply where possible. However, in addition to addressing these essentials, don’t forget to check your contracts and insurance policies, including:
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